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Google Consumer Surveys Adding About 1 Publisher a Day, If That

The Experts on Google Consumer Surveys - 05/24/12 07:00 AM

In a presentation to the Advertising Research Foundation, Google product developers said 3 things about the number of publishers who have signed up to participate with Google Consumer Surveys.

  1. Google will not disclose the number of publishers who have signed up, it’s confidential.
  2. OK, “dozens at dozens” of publishers have signed up.
  3. OK, “30 plus” publishers have signed up.

So, let’s be generous, and just to keep the math simple, let’s call it 40 publishers who have signed up to be part of Google Consumer Surveys, about 40 days after product launch.

Maybe 1 new publisher a day, giving Google the benefit of the doubt. And this is for something that costs publishers nothing, and theoretically makes publishers money.

Would you call this market response to Google Consumer Surveys …?

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor

As we have written, we have only seen Google Consumer Surveys on 3 websites, ever. We invited you then, and we re-invite you here, to let us know if you have ever seen Google Consumer Surveys on any other websites other than:

  1. The Lima News newspaper, in Lima OH,
  2. The Texas Tribune, a newspaper in Austin, TX.
  3. Adweek, a trade publication in New York City.

Even more striking to us was that during the Google presentation to the Advertising Research Foundation, when Google needed to “demo” #gsurveys to the researchers in attendance, and Google could have chosen any website in the world to make the best, most powerful impression, Google chose to go to LimaOhio.com, which — could it be? — might just be the only publisher website actively using Google Consumer Surveys.

Since Google Consumer Surveys actively promotes that it gives DIY researchers a regional breakdown on the research data it delivers, how many publisher websites do you think it needs to have before it can “make good” on that promise?

The Lima Ohio website does not have respondents from all over the United States — they are lucky to draw in respondents from Wapakoneta and Van Wert.

The Texas Tribune website does not have respondents from all over the United States — almost all of them are from Texas, and disproportionately from Austin.

And, yes, Adweek just might have a few respondents from outside of New York City, but think about what kind of narrow-sliver of respondents Adweek has? (The very first question many market research studies ask is, “Are you employed by an Ad Agency?” The Adweek respondents to Google Consumer Surveys are the respondents who other surveys are throwing out).

How does this business model work without thousands of participating publisher websites?

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